Some Landscapes

These are some preparatory studies for a show at Steel House this coming winter. I think they are more sophisticated than most of my earlier work. In particular, they offer one solution to a problem of diversity of behavior in algorithmic art: If a work is generated by a single organic algorithm, how can it look like something other than an undifferentiated mass?

Memento Mori

Remember that you will die! Memento Mori is a set of 12,978 images of a skull. On display now at Steel House Gallery. Click here to view 100 random high-resolution skulls.

From the gallery’s show description: ‘Memento Mori, Latin for “remember that you will die,” is a set of 12,978 images of a skull. These images are shown continuously on five monitors in the gallery space, with a selection shown in print on the wall. Each of these images is an algorithmic and geometric transfiguration of the same single black-and-white source photograph. Each image is unique, disposable, and replaceable. No person (including the artist) has seen them all. The work will be on view through February 15.’

Civita

During a recent visit to Civita di Bangoregio, I took a series of (amateur) smartphone photos of this ancient, eroded town and its environs. Enchanted by the local shapes and colors, I wrote software to algorithmically decompose these photos into lines and planes. This is the first result.

Flux

Here’s the completed work that has resulted from the previous studies. It’s called “Flux I”, and it will be the first in a series of images that are loosely inspired by the flow and behavior of fluids. The idea for this particular image came to me while watching waves crash over rocks along the Marginal Way, and I created it for my friends Emily Barnes and Mike Opest in New York City.